20180122

Modal 'MAY & MIGHT'



MAY and MIGHT

           
May and Might is used to say possibility. It can be true, it can be wrong:
-   A:  Where is Jane?
    B:  She may be in her office. (It is possible that she is in her office)
-   She might be in her office.    
-   She may be having lunch. (It is possible that she is having lunch)
-   She might be having lunch.
-   Ask Kevin. He may know
-   Ask Kevin. He might know.


*  The negative form of May and Might are May Not and Might Not:
-   I’m not sure if Jane is still in her office. She may not be there now.
-   I’m not sure if Jane is still in her office. She might not be there now.

*  The Past form of May and Might are May Have and Might Have:
-   Jason was not in his office when I came. He may have had lunch.
-   I met Jane in the mall but she didn’t say hello. She might not have seen me.
-   I wonder why Kevin didn’t come to the party. He may not have been invited.
-   Sarah can’t find her bag anywhere. She might have left it in the shop.

*  Sometimes Could also has the same function as May and Might:
-   Someone is knocking the door. It might be Kevin
-   Someone is knocking the door. It could be Kevin
-   A:  Where is Jane?
    B:  She may be in her office.
         She could be in her office.

Couldn’t is different from May Not and Might Not
-   No wonder Sarah didn’t say hello. She was too far away, She couldn’t have seen you.
Because the distance was too far away, She couldn’t see you.

-   I wonder why she didn’t say hello. She might not have seen me.
It was possible that she didn’t see me, but it was also possible that she saw me, she just didn’t want to say hello.
To say a possibility like this situation, we use May not/Might Not.


*  May and Might can also be used to say a possibility in the Future:
-   We haven’t decided yet where to go for holiday next month. We may go to Britain.
-   I’m not sure what car I’m going to buy. I might buy Mitsubishi.


May and Might have the same meaning and function. Except for unreal situation, we use Might:
-   She is beautiful. If I knew her better I might ask her to marry me.
-   If Sarah invited me, I might come to her party.
The real situation is Sarah didn’t invite me.


May As Well and Might As Well
May As Well and Might As Well are used to say that we better do something because there is no reason to not doing it:
-   I have a free ticket for a concert. I’m not very keen on the concert. But I may as well go to the concert. It’s a pity to waste a free ticket.
-   I’m in a café with Sarah. We have finished our drinks. It’s a nice café and we have nothing to do. So I tell her that we might as well have another drink.
-   A:  We have just missed the bus. We have to wait an hour for the next bus. What shall we do? Shall we walk?
    B:  We might as well. It’s a nice day and I don’t want to wait here for an hour.





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